Recycled Celery


Hello, 2015, and hello winter! The garden is cleared out, the compost tumbler is in hibernation mode, and everything outside is “battened-down” for the next few cold months ahead. Time to grow some green indoors. I plan on planting a few herbs on my window sill next week (parsley, cilantro, and maybe some basil) and since I was done with a bunch of celery in the fridge, I did this little project again this afternoon. Did you know you can put the end of your celery bunch in water to use as a fun houseplant? Just place your celery end so it is just touching the surface of the water in a jar or container. Within a day or two, you will start seeing growth at the center of the celery bunch! So fun. Depending on the size of your container, you might need toothpicks to help keep your celery end from slipping in.

Recycle your celery!

Here’s one I rooted previously, a few days into its growth.

I’ll be keeping my recycled celery in water and use it solely for winter-time decoration this time around. However, you could plant it in fertile soil and add it right to your garden! Read more about it at HuffPost Taste, Garden Swag, and 17 Apart.

How about you? Will you be growing any herbs or veggies indoors this winter?

June Garden Greenery

We are back from a wonderful vacation in Ocean City, New Jersey. As much as I wanted to stay longer, gathering shells and soaking in the sun, I knew real life needed my attention back at home. Not to mention a growing garden, and a grumpy cat! So here I am, back to reality, and thankfully, back to gardening. Here is what the garden has been up to.


The garden enclosure has been busy lately! The shelling peas are giving up their last pods…this was my first year growing peas and I loved it. I will definitely plant these every year. Shelling them is so therapeutic.



…and right beside them are the bush beans ready to take their place once I clear out the peas. I planted plenty so we should be in great supply for summer and freezing.


I’ve had mixed luck with my tomatoes from seed this year – some are doing great, some seem stunted. The three tomato plants in my enclosure (Cherry Lizzano, Gardener’s Delight, and Box Car Willie) are thriving, showing nice growth while I was gone. Here’s the Cherry Lizzano earlier this week – he’s even taller now, stretching out over the rungs that are above it in this picture:


Sadly, the tomatoes I planted in pots on the deck are not thriving as they should (too much rain, maybe? It has been quite wet.) I might have to swing by the garden store and purchase some heirloom tomato plants to replace the Cherokee Purple on the deck. Ironically, The best looking tomato is this guy:


This heirloom is a volunteer from last year, most likely a Brandywine, having dropped from the deck above. In spite of the partial shade and the less than hospitable ground, he’s doing great. Maybe I should plant all my tomatoes this way.


Last but not least in the enclosure (I have to come up with a nickname for this structure – enclosure is so boring) are my onions. I have planted these parade onions from seed for three years now, and I just love them.

Moving over to the Grow Camp, I have cucumbers taking hold quite nicely:


Along with lima beans that are eager to move into their neighbor swiss chard’s territory:



The eggplant seem to have recovered from their challenges earlier in the season and are growing nicely.

The kale was the first seed to sprout and it’s flourishing as quickly as I harvest it:


Last but not least in the Grow Camp, my bell peppers are already starting to form. Still waiting on the Jalapenos to take off.


On the deck in pots this year: Okra. I love okra. But I swore when aphids devoured it my first year gardening that I would not bother with them again. Well, I received several as a gift and could not turn them down. I’m using all the homemade aphid remedies I can think of, and they seem to be helping this year.



How has your garden grown in June? Leave a comment and let me know!

Newspaper Pots!


I recently “potted up” all my seedlings, and this year I tried something new – newspaper pots!


The little wood tool I used to form the pots is available at many garden centers, and it’s also available at Amazon and Gardener’s Supply.


After a little experimenting, I discovered it’s best to cut the newspaper just a tiny bit (half an inch) wider than what is indicated on the directions. This way, I could fold down the newspaper about a half an inch at the top to help reinforce the pot.


As I wrapped the newspaper around the form, I tucked the one end of the pot top into the fold on the other end so it fit nice and snug.


Next, I folded in the newspaper on the bottom. I found the more little folds I made as I worked my way around, the better. If I just did three or four folds, it flopped open really easily.


Lastly, I fit my pot into the base of the mold. This helps shape those folds so they stay put.


And that’s it! I churned out about 20 of these bad boys and put them to good use with my seedlings last weekend. So far, they are holding up well. They seem to retain just enough moisture to keep my “sproutlings” (as my son calls them) happy, without the container breaking down, yet. The plan is to pop these guys right into the next container, be it another pot, or the garden itself, where this container will eventually break down.


Here’s one of my Cherry Lizzanos one week after potting up.

What’s your favorite seedling container?